LEADERSHIP, PART TWO

“Leadership cannot be exercised by the weak. It demands strength–the strength of this great nation when its people are united in a purpose, united in a common fundamental faith, united in their readiness to work for human freedom and peace. . .”–Dwight D. Eisenhower

Leadership Theories:

Ohio State Leadership Studies (1945):

The leader is concerned with organizational patterns, channels of communication, decision-making procedures, and organizational goals.

In addition, the leader has focus in establishing and maintaining positive relations with staff and workers.

In all of this, theorists find that good leaders are able to analyze a situation, depending on the personality of the leader.

Another leadership theory concerns itself with friendly work atmosphere, friendliness, trust, and respect both from workers and from employers, so that morale is kept at a balanced level.

Finally, there is the “Situational Theory of Leadership.” The leader’s behavior depends upon his or her maturity level acquired with skills and experiences. Each particular situation requires skill, experience, and a sense of responsibility for achieving goals.

Some leaders never “get better”; others do.

Once again, it all seems so simple, simply put, clear.

It is difficult to be a good leader, and also to be a good follower of a good leader. Sometimes the mix will never be achieved. Personalities clash, goals are not attainable, work environment is unstable,

Then, there is another theory for work:

 “THE BEATINGS WILL CONTINUE UNTIL MORALE IMPROVES!”

 Question_mark_(black_on_white)


Advertisements
2 comments
  1. Yeah, that last one… Funny how many people think that that is actually true.

%d bloggers like this: